National Eating Disorders Association
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In the eating disorders community, we often hear the phrase “Not every diet leads to an eating disorder, but every eating disorder starts with a diet.” That’s true, but if we really want to prevent eating disorders and allow for full recovery, we can’t stop there. We have to ask ourselves the next logical question: Where do the diets come from?

NEDA’s merger with BEDA last fall was an important step toward unifying the eating disorders community and improving access to services and support across the entire spectrum of these illnesses. NEDA is committed to continuing many of the contributions BEDA made to the eating disorders field. Today, we are excited to announce the continuation of Weight Stigma Awareness Week which was established in 2011. 

This blog post is sponsored by Veritas Collaborative.

September is Suicide Prevention Month, and now more than ever, we need to examine how we can each play a role in decreasing suicide rates in the United States and beyond. 

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States and on average, 129 individuals die by suicide each day. Individuals diagnosed with eating disorders are particularly vulnerable, with suicide rates for this population up to 31 times more than the suicide rate for the general population. 

This blog post is sponsored by EDCare.

When it comes to eating disorder treatment, recovery is the goal. Equipping oneself with adequate tools and skills is necessary to maintain long-term eating disorder recovery. 

In support of NEDA Walks across the United States, we walk to show long-term eating disorder recovery is possible!  Here is how you can incorporate important recovery principles when you attend your local NEDA Walk. 

In this day and age with all the apps, dating has become mainstream. But, while it’s become extremely accessible for all communities, it’s also become ever fleeting. You meet someone and there’s one thing you don’t like about them, so you go on the apps and continue to swipe. This could lead to a date that night. Now imagine this scenario, but add in the fact that I am in recovery from an eating disorder and struggle with body image issues—that’s a whole other can of worms. 

This roundtable discussion series is a collaboration between NEDA and the Yoga and Body Image Coalition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This blog post is sponsored by The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt.

Let’s talk about celebrity. Glamour. Glitz. Lights. Camera. Action! Most of us watch TV. We go to the movies. Maybe we watch the Academy Awards, the Grammys, the Golden Globes. We read magazines, whether intentionally or accidentally glancing at the obnoxious, screaming headlines as we wait in line at the store. 

It’s intoxicating. Isn’t there a part of you that wants to get all done up, to be photographed and placed on a stage and adored by millions of fans? I sure do. Who doesn’t want to be adored?

It was the summer of 1977. I had just graduated from college, summa cum laude with honors. I had gotten accepted to an Ivy League graduate program and decided to take a year off before enrolling. I had applied for an internship in Washington DC with my congresswoman and planned to spend the year in DC.  Unfortunately, the internship did not come through. With DC off the table, I did not really have a Plan B for my “gap” year. 

I have loved theatre since I was a toddler. It has always been an integral part of who I am; my deepest obsession. Until another one took over: food. I was a teenager when I started struggling with disordered eating, and things escalated when I began college. “Clean” eating consumed my life to the point where I lost my period for four years. Gone was the bubbly, confident girl who sang in taxi cabs. In her place, there was a new Domenica: one who was painfully insecure, socially isolated, and lived in terror of missing a workout or eating anything that wasn’t “safe.”  

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