National Eating Disorders Association
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The day I began treatment for my eating disorder was the August before the start of my sophomore year of high school. It was also the day my season of cross country track was scheduled to start. After my pediatrician was unable to sign off on the medical clearance forms, I was forced to go talk to my coach about how I wouldn’t be able to run with them this season. I was anxious when I walked into his office, expecting an angry response. 

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Exposure to an extreme traumatic stressor involving direct personal experience of an event that involves actual or threatened death or serious injury or threat to one’s physical integrity is included in the description of the diagnosis for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Sexually traumatic events for children may include developmentally inappropriate sexual experiences without threat of actual violence or injury. Physical and/or sexual abuse, incest, and rape are all included in the events hailing the diagnosis of PTSD, according to the DSM-IV. 

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Halloween can be a difficult time of the year for those who are struggling or who have struggled with an eating disorder. The overwhelming presence of candy and attention-grabbing costumes can often make the night feel as though it’s fueled more by tricks than treats. It can be especially difficult since it is so ingrained in our culture and thus, difficult to avoid. 

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Halloween is right around the corner. While the smell of cinnamon and carving pumpkins can be exciting, costumes are sometimes a cause of offense. In previous years, Halloween costumes have had a tendency to veer more toward offensive than fun by parodying race, religion, mental illness, gender, and disabilities. As you start to pick out your costume, keep these things in mind.

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Today marks PACER’s 2017 Unity Day! Now is a time to unite for kindness, acceptance, and inclusion, and pledge to create a world without bullying. When we stand together, no one stands alone!

Below, three of our writers shared their experiences with bullying, as well as tips on how to protect yourself. 

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Eating disorders disproportionately affect members of the LGBTQ+ community and bullying can serve as one factor in the development of an eating disorder. As a whole, LGBTQ+ young people are more likely to experience bullying at school, sexual harassment, cyberbullying, and property damage. 

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Today is Body Confidence Day, a time to honor our unique and amazing bodies and selves! We'll be celebrating on Twitter with a #NEDAchat on body positivity, diverse role models, and self-care techniques. Aerie model Iskra Lawrence, singer/songwriter Matthew Koma, and our other panelists will share personal experiences, helpful tips, and resources for support.

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When I was deeply suffering from my eating disorder, I hated my body. I abused it. Worst of all, I separated myself from it. My mind became one entity and my body became another. To my mind, my body seldom did anything right. 

Since entering recovery, I have had to learn how to care for my body, how to nourish it, and how to appreciate it. But most importantly, I have had to accept that I am my body and my body is me. I will never be able to separate from my body, nor should I want to. When I hurt my body, I am hurting myself.

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When casual viewers think of horror, images of scantily-clad women and problematic depictions of institutionalized people typically come to mind. And while there is no shortage of “naked-promiscuous-woman-is-slaughtered-while-nice-guy-flees-deranged-killer” horror flicks out there, a growing number of horror films are offering empowering messages and thought-provoking cultural critiques to viewers. 

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We are nearing the end of Hispanic Heritage Month (also known as Latino Heritage Month), and although this month purports to celebrate and honor brown culture, it is a time that evokes feelings of dissociation for me. Yes, I am of Mexican-indigenous descent, and I genuinely appreciate recognition and celebration of people of the brown diaspora. I don’t, however, understand the logic behind the language used—Hispanic, Latino, Latinx—to describe a group of people that I have felt forced to identify with all these years. 

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