National Eating Disorders Association
Blog
Anorexia

From eighth to tenth grade, I struggled with anorexia, and eventually I began struggling with bulimia. A significant factor in the development of my eating disorder was a lack of exposure to the social world in the early stages of my life, while I was home schooled.

I longed to feel included and I would beg my mom to let me go to public school. Being home schooled is vastly different from being educated in the public school system. In eighth grade I was finally able to live the life I wanted, and I began public school. 

Read more >

As a composer, my purpose always seemed (keyword, seemed) straightforward. Even before I dealt with anorexia nervosa, I thought my sole reason for existence was to make music and have it heard. While that is a major goal of mine — as it is for any composer or artist out there — it’s by no means my reason to live.

Read more >

I have bipolar II—manic depression. This means that my mood has many highs and lows. One minute I think I’m invincible, filled with copious amounts of energy. The next, I’m overcome with sadness and dark thoughts. I have to take medicine in order to manage —otherwise, the state of my moods would be out of control.

Read more >

While both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are associated with a litany of medical complications , with timely and successful treatment the vast majority of these complications do not leave permanent residual sequelae (conditions that are the result of a previous disease). 

Read more >

I was raised with the belief that language is important.  I was taught that that the precision of my words could greatly affect the impact of what I say. When I first met my partner a little over two years ago, one of the main things we bonded over was our love of language. A creative writer herself, I could see how carefully she spoke.

Read more >

Eating disorders can be terrifying, confusing, and, perhaps worst of all, lonely.

First comes the diagnosis, and probably some scary news from the doctor. In our case it was Anorexia Nervosa. Nothing about dealing with it is remotely intuitive. But, with the help of a good medical team, we turned the corner.

Read more >

British Member of Parliament, Brooks Newmark, was just 17 when he endured anorexia nervosa. He surely knows that overcoming the disease takes not only mass amounts of support, but research to help understand the dynamics of such a crippling eating disorder. Fortunately, the newly appointed minister of the Civil Society has recently donated his blood to a study that seeks to collect 25,000 samples from those who have suffered, by 2016.

Read more >

“I am not as sick as the other women… I don’t need treatment.”

I heard this statement from time to time in my role as a support staff counselor in an eating disorder rehab. My response? I’d say,
 
“Interesting. Tell me, what makes you less sick than the others?”

The answers I would hear were:
“I am not that underweight…”
“I am not that overweight…”
“I am not as crazy as her…”
“I am not as angry as her…”

I would then ask,

Read more >

People like me who experience anorexia nervosa want to make our life count; we want to do something so that others do not suffer like us. And we can.

Already, hundreds of us have participated in exciting research, ANGI, the Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative, by contributing a blood sample.

Read more >

When you’re struggling with an eating disorder and body dysmorphia, you and your body literally live on two different planets, you’re so far apart, so disconnected, so estranged.

You probably believe your body is ugly, repulsive, basically just a thing that’s connected to your head. A thing you don’t like or want and would give away in a heartbeat.

I’ve been there. I know exactly how it feels.

Read more >

Pages