National Eating Disorders Association

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kboyle
New--

My daughter is 16 and bulimic. She had hidden this for years, and while I haven't read everything, I do feel this is something that impacts the whole family. (In fact it's tearing me apart to see how family issues--husband's chronic unemployment-- may have contributed to this.) But right now, she is seeing a therapist, nutritionist and primary care giver. I am not in the room. She does not want her father to know about it. I don't know if this is the best approach, but am going with it since this is what we have. Also, still confused about what role I should play, whether I should let the treatment work it's course, or take more control over watching what she eats and not leaving her home alone.
Thanks for this group. I live in a great area as far as good medical care, but don't seem to have much nearby for this. Just therapists--the top recommended are booked, so we it looks like we will just need to try different ones.

kate84
New--

Hi, kboyle! I am not a parent myself... but as a young woman who previously struggled with an eating disorder and wished I had the strength to tell my parents - I think that you are absolutely doing the "right thing" by getting your daughter the help she needs.

As for specific treatment options, you can try this link and see if it gives you any results nearby - https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/find-treatment. You can also try calling the NEDA Helpline (1-800-931-2237, 9-9 Mon-Thurs & 9-5 on Fri)... they are an incredible group of volunteers who can provide you with information and referrals for treatment in your area.

Also, if you haven't found them already, NEDA has some great resources for parents:
https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/parent-toolkit
https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/parent-family-friends-network

I hope that you are able to find the treatment that works best for your daughter - just know that you are not alone! The fact that you are there for your daughter right now (and genuinely concerned for her) speaks volumes. A good support system is so important in recovery!