National Eating Disorders Association

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constantvigilance
Binge Eating Recovery

Sup, everyone. This'll be my first post.

So I've been struggling with binge eating since 2012 now, and decided to do something about it in 2017. It's never shown physically because I like to keep fit.

I went and got therapy and have been actioning the steps. They've worked for the most part, but it's so hard. Sometimes I won't even use them because the urge is so hard to get rid of. It's overwhelming. I have goals in life and fitness but in that moment, then and there, nothing else matters. I just want to be filled with food. In the following days, my productivity is at an all time low.

I'm trying so hard with the dealing with the urges, but they accumulate (e.g. I'll deal with them one day, then they'll come back stronger the next). I want to get out of this. I'm scared to let people outside my family/past therapists know, and I don't go out drinking with my friends because I'm terrified of gaining weight through excess calories.

I've no idea what to do anymore. I just want to stop doing it.

Bit deep, but that's the truth, lol.

Vinnymac69
I can totallly relate

I’m a very fit and strong guy and I eat fairly healthy, but when it comes time to eat with my family I splurge. In my case, I found it easier to not overeat by drinks tons of water. I’m still sturggling with binge eating so I can’t give you a good solution lmao. I hope you the best.

Homersapien
I would never recommend this

I would never recommend this for most people, but yes - drinking does help. It's a 'better than' sort of scenario in my case - better to drink plenty of tea than to lose control over my diabetes by binging.

First, though, you have to make the steps. Even baby steps help. The longer you go without binging, the less likely it is that you'll continue.

Have you got any areas you'd like to work on?

adagio
Encouragement + Some Tricks

Hey Constantvigilance. Firstly––I love your username. It's a good way to describe the mindset one must have when overcoming these sorts of challenges. I am also a pretty active guy who enjoys the competition fo sport, and too, someone who caves now and then and binges. I don't like when these episodes happen because they mess with my energy and concentration levels.

I totally get the feeling of "want to just be filled with food". In my experience, when I start to have these thoughts I ask myself, "am I overdoing it on the fitness? Am I fueling my body enough to keep up with my active life? Am I setting aside time to let me body and mind rest?"

I'm still learning to accept this funny fact that the body and the mind are wound up in a crazy web of connection, and that they communicate with each other. As an athlete, I was taught by a few of my coaches to ignore the symptoms of the body, that, "if you're sore/tired/exhausted-beyond-belief you're doing it 'right" and that "the point of sport is to master your mind and learn to control your thoughts." What ended up happening to me is that I would ignore my boy's symptoms (soreness, fatigue, sickenss) and keep pushing forward because that's what I believed to be 'right' way to manage training. But my mind caught up eventually, and I began to overeat. I would get so frustrated with myself because I thought it was my "weak" mind that was giving up. So I up'd the intensity and continued on with training. But again, I would binge, and I would pity my lack of discipline. What I was missing was the unavoidable fact that I wasn't listening to my body's needs, which is still something that I struggle with to this day. I'd look at my other teammates and see them train just as hard as me, and not experience any struggles with binging (as far as I knew) and I would think low of myself. But instead what I should have done was just accepted the fact that my body has different needs than my teammates and that I need to respect them. I don't 'have' and body, I 'am' a body––which means I have to think of my self (mind, ego) and my body as one unit that is connected (like I said earlier).

Now,
when it comes to escaping the black hole of a binge episode, there are tricks that have worked for me in the past in certain moments but have also failed me in others which is why I recommend you make a list of multiple things that help ease your mind and your body!
On the top of my list is talking. I'll pick up the phone and call a friend. Being social helps me reduce my anxiety. I don't normally tell my friend the battle that I'm fighting on my end because I'd rather talk about something else to get my mind off the matter. I try and call my funniest friend because laughing is the best medicine. If no one is free to chat, I love to write. It helps me to remove myself from my apartment if an urge is particularly bad, so I'll literally grab my notebook and pen and sit in the main lobby of my apartment building and write. Going for a walk is another one that I like, but I tend to do it less frequently. Lastly, plugging in my headphones and lying down with my favorite songs/playlists is so strangely calming. I've even made a playlist that helps me fight the urges to run to the cabinets. I pick songs that remind me of my friends and family. I pick songs with lyrics that remind me of why being my best and healthiest self matters and that we are never alone in this struggle.

These are a few things that have worked for me, but I recommend you come up with your own list! It isn't a perfect list, because sometimes the urge just gets so insane and I succumb. Its embarrassing sure, but I'm reminded of my humanity, and I try my best to wake up the next morning with the intention of just being better than yesterday (which sounds cheesy, but once you think about it, it makes so much sense).

I hope these words help man!

Adagio