National Eating Disorders Association
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30 Million Americans will struggle with an eating disorder at some point in their life and 10 million of those are men, a number that I think is extremely underrepresented due to the stigmas that surround mental health and men. Eating disorders in men is something you hear far too little about, but it’s something I am far too familiar with. And thanks to NEDA taking steps to spread awareness of not only eating disorders in general but men in particular, the word is beginning to spread.

I was 22 when I was a diagnosed with an eating disorder, although my eating disorder tendencies began long before then. Like many other courageous individuals, I sought treatment, even though I was in complete denial. Unlike many others, I did not have an abundant circle filled with support; people with whom I could speak openly and candidly about the difficulties, fears, and sorrows of the recovery process. 

And, as I recover, I am learning that my story is different. And that is SO okay. 

My dad didn’t know what to do to help me with my eating disorder.  

So, he did what he’s really good at and passed along some numbers: (800) 931-2237 (He’s an engineer.) I still have that handwritten piece of paper. Thank you, Dad.  

Calling those ten digits for help was a huge leap of faith. At that point in my life, no one knew I had an eating disorder except for my parents and the boyfriend who made me tell them (Now, I can say thanks to him, too.). 

I am not telling anyone else. 

Professional wrestling offers a unique combination of athleticism and the art of storytelling. Through the use of larger-than-life characters and sometimes relatable storylines, the audience is met with events they can connect with. For months, professional wrestler Adam Page has offered a storyline of his journey through pressures of looking perfect for a big matchup. His friends make comments that he needs to be “full gear ready” (skinnier and bulkier) for this match.

This blog post is sponsored by Rogers Behavioral Health.

Being out in nature, enjoying the warmth of a greenhouse, and working with plants all have a positive effect on someone’s mood and can also reduce anxiety. Because of this, horticultural therapy has been a valuable component of care across a variety of treatment settings, and is an especially good fit in eating disorder recovery.

World Eating Disorders Action Day 2019

Eating Disorders: We Can't Afford to Wait

Awareness hurts, but it saved my life. Awareness is far more difficult than being ambivalent or ignorant, but it is absolutely necessary for recovery.

My beautiful mother Judy seemed to always defy the odds her whole life. In the face of her struggle with mental illness, more specifically anorexia, depression, and anxiety, I witnessed a very strong woman, though she might not have felt that way.  When I think about my mom, what comes to mind quickly is courage, bravery, resilience, and perseverance! She was, and is, an overcomer! 

My sister, Bridget, was diagnosed with anorexia when she was in 7th grade; she was only 12 years old. I was a freshman in high school, and at 15, I had limited capacity or empathy for her daily challenges. I have to admit, it took losing her for me to more fully understand the depth of this disease and its impacts.

After twenty-two years of suffering with anorexia and depression, my sister ended her life and her suffering at the age of 34. Our family has chosen to share her story in hopes that fewer suffer and more survive.

It's May 6th, which means the NEDA Network's first national No Diet Day is finally here! NEDA is excited to collaborate with our Network members on this important initiative to encourage the rejection of diet culture, and to promote the elimination of shame associated with society’s standards of beauty and respect for all body shapes and sizes.

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