Recovery

How Social Media Led Me to Recovery

By: 
Joanna Kay

 The Internet has played a complicated role in my battle against an eating disorder.

In the depths of my illness, I used to scour the web to learn how to become a “better” anorexic. I was a slave to it. With every year that I lived with it (twelve in all), anorexia consumed increasingly more of my mind and body, until its goals fused completely with my own. I wanted—I needed—to lose weight, and the Internet, a vast fund of information and pro-eating disorder communities, seemed to hold the key.

Read More

Jenni Schaefer: Passing the Recovery Baton

By: 
Maggi Flaherty, Director of Communications & Digital Engagement

Family members play an integral role in supporting their love one's recovery. During the Friends & Family Kick-Off Dinner to open the NEDA Conference last week in San Antonio, TX, this idea was thoroughly explored through a "Friends & Family" panel discussion.

The event was emceed Thomas P. Britton, DrPH, LPC, LCAS, ACS, CCS  from CRC Health Group and the panel was moderated by NEDA Ambassador and author, Jenni Schaefer, and featured individuals in support and treatment roles:

Read More

Expressive Arts Therapy and Eating Disorders

By: 
Dr. Deah Schwartz

I like to talk. To anyone who knows me, this is not news.  From the time I was in elementary school, to my parent’s dismay, my report cards consistently informed them that I needed to stop talking so much in class.   Some may say that I talk too much, others may say that I am hyper-verbal.  Any way you frame it, the bottom line is, I am a very chatty person.  Being verbally outgoing has its advantages.  I meet wonderful people in strange situations where if I wasn’t comfortable initiating a conversation, I never would have made their acquaintance.

Read More

Our Neighbors to the North Show us How They Mark Eating Disorders Awareness Week

By: 
Priyanka Parshad

Like the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) in the US, Canada's National Eating Disorders Information Centre (NEDIC) supports and promotes a variety of country-wide initiatives to inform the public and ignite hope within our communities .

Read More

The Marginalized Voices Project

By: 
Susie Roman, Director of Programs

The National Eating Disorders Association, in association with feminist activist and editor of Everyday Feminism, Melissa Fabello, is calling for stories that focus on underrepresented experiences and communities in the eating disorder field through The Marginalized Voices Project. We are looking especially for voices from marginalized communities and narratives that challenge eating disorder myths.

Read More

Other Ways Out: Marginalized Voices in Eating Disorder Recovery

By: 
Melissa Fabello, Editor, Everyday Feminism

Pick up any eating disorder memoir at your local bookstore, and you are more than likely to find some iteration of this narrative arc.

Well-to-do, young white woman develops an eating disorder, spirals into near-oblivion, seeks treatment for her eating disorder (which usually results in her being admitted into a residential facility), experiences a myriad of successes and failures, and eventually commits to finding her Self again. Well-to-do, young white woman walks out of treatment with a new sense of hope on the road to recovery.

Read More

Reflections on Hope: Wisdom from Our Readers!

By: 
Ellen Domingos, Community Outreach Specialist

Continued from Volume 7, Issue 1 of Making Connections

Read More

How to find your way back to your body

By: 
Anne-Sophie Reinhardt

When you’re struggling with an eating disorder and body dysmorphia, you and your body literally live on two different planets, you’re so far apart, so disconnected, so estranged.

You probably believe your body is ugly, repulsive, basically just a thing that’s connected to your head. A thing you don’t like or want and would give away in a heartbeat.

I’ve been there. I know exactly how it feels.

Read More

Lessons in Self-Care: 5 Ways to Survive and Thrive Through the Holidays When You Have an Eating Disorder

By: 
August McLaughlin

“Change happens when you understand what you want to change so deeply that there is no reason to do anything but act in your own best interest.” — Geneen Roth

Food, family gatherings and thankfulness are centerpieces of many Americans’ holidays—often in that order. These very traits commonly deemed attributes are precisely what make the food-centric season challenging when you have an eating disorder, which can make festive food displays daunting and the company of others intimidating

Read More

Pages